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Home / STS/CSIS Colloquium, March 1st: Dr. Helen Verran - “Concepts and Re-Presentations in Ethnography: How to use concepts between different knowledge traditions and between writing and field”

STS/CSIS Colloquium, March 1st: Dr. Helen Verran - “Concepts and Re-Presentations in Ethnography: How to use concepts between different knowledge traditions and between writing and field”

When Mar 01, 2017
from 02:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Where Social Science Building 1246 (STS Conference Room)
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Please join STS/CSIS for a colloquium event with:

 

Dr. Helen Verran

Contemporary Indigenous Knowledge and Governance

Charles Darwin University, Australia

 

“Concepts and Re-Presentations in Ethnography: How to use concepts between different knowledge traditions and between writing and field”

 

on Wednesday, March 1st, 2-4 pm, in the STS/CSIS Conference Room (Social Science and Humanities Building Room 1246).

 

Abstract:

As researchers we work with analytic concepts, yet concepts are instruments which sometimes sit in uneasy relation to empirics, and bodies and the differing here and nows ethnographers work in. Students are often stumped when asked to name their analytic concepts and describe how ethnographic methods contribute in the methodological work of making epistemic claims. And increasingly we expect the ethical and political implications that are necessarily embedded in such claims, to also be considered. In this discussion, I will think aloud along these lines. My concerns at present involve two complex situations of ethnographic re-presentation: working with Aboriginal Australian community members and public servants concerned with governance, and working with northern Norwegian landscapes, ethnographic stories from the past, and large rocks.

 

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Dr. Verran is a philosopher and ethnographer. Her book, Science and an African Logic – about counting in English and Yoruba theory and practice – was a breakthrough publication in the field of Science and Technology Studies. Since then, her work as used in ecology and policy has crucially helped to open up ‘numbers’ as an object of anthropological study. Her work on knowledge/practices with aboriginal Australian groups continues to inspire new thinking about method in anthropology and beyond. For more information about Dr. Verran and her work, see also: http://www.cdu.edu.au/professor-helen-verran

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